Patient Slings

Supplying patient transfer slings, stand assist, rehabilitation aids and transfer products which equip end users and caregivers alike with safety, comfort, dignity and independence.  Keeping in stock slings from Invacare and Oxford alongwith...

Supplying patient transfer slings, stand assist, rehabilitation aids and transfer products which equip end users and caregivers alike with safety, comfort, dignity and independence.  Keeping in stock slings from Invacare and Oxford alongwith our own brand.

All Oxford slings we supply now include as standard, a woven guidance label and serialised SWL tab replacing the old printed silk label.
In comparison to the printed silk label, the new woven labels are designed to ensure service critical information does not fade through regular washing, especially at high temperatures. This new label solution not only has an improved look and feel, but ensures Oxford slings benefit from extended service lives, eliminating what has been a common source of frustration.

Did you know?
Slings, like hoists, come under the LOLER regulation 1998, which means they need to be visually inspected every six months by a competent person. However, a lot can change with slings within a 6-month period especially in a high usage environment, so what is really important is that before each and every sling transfer is made, the carer carrying out the transfer must visually inspect the sling before they use it to ensure the on-going safety of the patient.  An example of why a sling would be classed as unfit for continued use, is due to illegible SWL and/or serial number - now a thing of the past!

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Slings should be treated with care and inspected prior to each individual use in order to guarantee patient safety before they may be moved with a hoist or standing aid. Like anything else, slings can become worn and torn over time due to the age and conditions it has been used under.

To ensure that your slings are safe for each use, we present to you 4 top tips to check for before using a moving and handling sling.


1. General External Wear

The sling starts to show sign of fluffiness in the surface fibres caused possibly by sharp edges on straps or Velcro. This is usually harmless, unless it becomes too extensive. A usable sling will normally keep its smooth and flat appearance.

2. Local Abrasion In The Webbing Straps

This may be caused by the passage of the webbing over the sharp edges whilst under tension or Velcro. Slight damage to the outer fibres may be considered safe but in severe cases this should lead to instant rejection of the sling and the need to replace with a new one.

3. Cuts, Holes Or Burns

Sadly any visible cuts, holes or burns in the sling will mean that it is an instant write-off. Dispose and replace the patients sling immediately.

4. Examination Of Stitch Patterns

Examine the stitch patterns for signs of broken, worn, pulled or unravelled stitches. If any are found reject the product immediately. Any sign that the thread on the sling has become subject to excessive abrasion or broken stitches could jeopardise your patients safety.

Remember, if there is any sign of excessive damage to the fabric or straps the sling is not safe to use. So make sure you run through these four points before every lift - visually examine the slings structural integrity!

 

 

 

 

It is a legal requirement in the industry that each sling manufactured carries its own identification number and carries the following essential information:

  • Model reference number
  • Image identification
  • Sling type
  • Size
  • Manufactured date
  • All testing and certification marks (CE or similar)
  • SWL Maximum load
  • Barcode
  • Inspection label
  • Individual barcode, serial number and batch number


If the sling loses its label, or the label can no longer be read due to fading, the sling should NOT be used. We are now able to offer a sling range that has fully embroidered labels containing all this vital information. Embroidered labels ensure that there is no chance of fading over time, thus greatly increasing the longevity of the sling.

The achievement of a good sitting position is the result of a number of interrelated factors requiring the chair to be tailored to each individual. Remember to consider the correct Seat Height (too High / too Low), correct Seat Width (too Wide / too Narrow) & correct Seat Depth (too Short / too Long).

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